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OpenRGB v0.5
OpenRGB v0.5 Open source RGB lighting control that doesn't depend on manufacturer software. For Windows, Linux, MacOS. ASUS, ASRock, Corsair, G.Skill, Gigabyte, HyperX, MSI, Razer, ThermalTake, and more supported. One of the biggest complaints about RGB is the software ecosystem surrounding it. Every manufacturer has their own app, their own brand, their own style. If you want to mix and match devices, you end up with a ton of conflicting, functionally identical apps competing for your background resources. On top of that, these apps are proprietary and Windows-only. Some even require online accounts. What if there was a way to control all of your RGB devices from a single app, on both Windows and Linux, without any nonsense? That is what OpenRGB sets out to achieve. One app to rule them all. Features Set colors and select effect modes for a wide variety of RGB hardware Save and load profiles Control lighting from third party software using the OpenRGB SDK Command line interface Connect multiple instances of OpenRGB to synchronize lighting across multiple PCs Can operate standalone or in a client/headless server configuration View device information No official/manufacturer software required Graphical view of device LEDs makes creating custom patterns easy See the Supported Devices page for the current list of supported devices. WARNING! This project interacts directly with hardware using reverse engineered protocols. While we do our best to make sure we're sending the right data, there is always some risk in sending data to hardware when we don't understand exactly how that hardware works. There have been two instances of hardware damage in OpenRGB's development and we've taken precautions to prevent it from happening again. The MSI Mystic Light code reportedly bricked the RGB on certain MSI boards when sending certain modes. This code has been disabled and MSI Mystic Light motherboards will not work with OpenRGB ...
5/5 403 Mar 30, 2021
Adam Honse
   
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